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Archive for the ‘Community Events’ Category

The 2nd Canadian Labour International Film Festival will be coming to Guelph on November 28 for a special Festival-in-a box screening at the Guelph and District Labour Council, 141 Woolwich Street, (Matrix Building, Woolwich and Eramosa) starting at 2.00 p.m.

CLiFF aims to increase awareness about labour issues worldwide by screening short films about workers and the conditons under which they live in over 50 locations across Canada about workers and the conditions under which they live and work.

Twenty-two Canadian and international films have been selected for the festival, nine are Canadian, four American, two British, and one each from Australia, Egypt, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Turkey and the Netherlands.

The featured films to be shown in Guelph are:

  • The Union Song (2010). A short video featuring a bluegrass song about how all members of the education community work together to keep the public school system strong (3 minutes).
    DIRECTOR: Daniel Fewings
    PRODUCER: Daniel Fewings, Canada
  • The Delano Manongs – Forgotten Heroes Of The UFW (Trailer, 2010). The story of farm labour organizer Larry Itliong and a group of Filipino farm workers who instigated one of the American farm labour movement’s finest hours – The Delano Grape Strike of 1965 that brought about the creation of the United Farm Workers Union (UFW). While the movement is known for Cesar Chavez’s leadership and considered a Chicano movement, Filipinos played a pivotal role that began it all. Filipino labour organizer, Larry Itliong, a five foot five cigar-chomping union veteran, organized a group of 1500 Filipinos to strike against the grape growers of Delano, California (6 minutes 57 seconds)
    DIRECTOR: Marissa Aroy
    PRODUCER: Niall McKay, USA
  • Neoliberalism As Water Balloon (2009).  A DIY experiment illustrating the impact of neoliberal economics on class, race and gender equality (12 minutes)
    DIRECTOR: Tim McCaskell
    PRODUCER: Richard Fung, Canada
  • Work In Progress (2009). The life of an injured worker is seen through her challenges, both personal and the bureaucratic (11 minutes 33 seconds)
    DIRECTOR: Chavisa
    PRODUCER: Chavisa, Canada
  • Special Pass (2009). A documentary about a group of foreign workers in Singapore who attempt to seek shelter and support themselves while out of work. This is the lesser-known story of foreigners who receive little support in a country that, ironically, was built by the work of immigrants (24 minutes).
    DIRECTOR: Vicknesh Varan
    PRODUCER: Rupture Films, Singapore
  • The Curious Case Of The Missing Recovery (2010). “Stanfordo” searches far and wide for answers to a mystery that continues to baffle hard-working Canadians. How can the federal government and Bank of Canada proclaim an economic recovery when hundreds of thousands of workers are still jobless, and millions are still reeling from one of the worst downturns since the Great Depression? (13 minutes 25 seconds)
    DIRECTOR: Michael Connolly
    PRODUCER: CAW, Canada
  • Silent Voices: Home-based Women Workers In Pakistan (2010). The stories of home-based women workers in Pakistan, told in a gritty and realistic style (14 minutes)
    DIRECTOR: Aisha Gazdar
    PRODUCER: Films D’Art, Pakistan/France
  • Sudden Wake (2009). The story of the struggle of Egypt’s first independent trade union – the Real Estate Tax Authority Union (RETA). RETA was formed in December 2008, one year after tax collectors there held a two-week sit-in in front of the Cabinet Building. They face constant harrassment from the Egyptian government as well as the country’s official labour federation, the ETUF.
    DIRECTOR: Mahmud Farag
    PRODUCER: Hamza Ashraf, Egypt
  • Red Dust (2010). The incredible story of resistance, courage and hope by women workers in China battling cadmium poisoning and demanding justice from the local government and their employer, a multi-national battery manufacturer (20 minutes).
    DIRECTOR: Karin T. Mak
    PRODUCER: Karin T. Mak, USA

Scotty Hertz, host of The Working Week on CFRU 93.3fm and one of the organizers of the CLiFF Guelph screening will be one of our guests on Royal City Rag during our second hour on Saturday November 27 (9-10 a.m).

Remember if you don’t catch Royal City Rag live, you can always pick it up later that day via the CFRU archive or on this website a day or so later.

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We’re dedicating the whole of CFRU 93.3fm’s Royal City Rag on November 6 to Our Environmental Future, a symposium taking place this coming Wednesday, November 10 from 4.30 p.m. – 10.30 p.m. in the Thornborough Building Rm 1200 at the University of Guelph.

The forum, organized by City of Guelph Councillor Maggie Laidlaw, The Guelph Chapter of the Council of Canadians, Transition Guelph, and the University of Guelph featuring the following presentations:

  • Peter Victor, York University Professor, Managing Without Growth – Yes We Can
  • Evan Fraser, University of Guelph, Empires Of Food And The Rise And Fall Of Civilizations
  • Robert Rapier, Peak Oil Expert, Peak Oil   What?  When?
  • Mike Nickerson, Executive Director of The Sustainability Project, Life, Money and Illusion: Living On Earth As If We Want To Stay
  • Jennifer Sumner, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto, Effects of Growth On Communities

The series of lectures will be followed by a panel discussion and an opportunity for questions from the audience.

Catch Maggie Laidlaw, Sally Ludwig Norah Chaloner and Mike Nickerson on CFRU 93.3fm’s Royal City Rag between 8 -10 a.m. on November 6. Real voices, real people, real coverage, real community, CFRU 93.3fm.

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Significant changes have taken place in Bolivia since the election of Latin America’s first peasant-indigenous President, Evo Morales. in 2006. In addition to approving a new constitution that establishes the continent’s first plurinational democratic state, Bolivia was the site of the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth held last April 2010.

A Canada-Bolivia conference and solidarity event: Canada-Bolivia Relations in the Next Decade will be taking place here at the University of Guelph on Saturday, November 6.  This is a unique opportunity to experience and understand the impact this has had on the people of Bolivia. 

The special guest speaker for the event will be Hugo Salvatierra Gutierrez, former Bolivian Minister for Rural Development, Agriculture and the Environment in the Evo Morales government and director of ALAS (the Office for Legal Advice and Social Advocacy), an office that works with labour, peasant and indigenous organizations in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

Canada-Bolivia Relations In The Next Decade
Saturday, November 6 from  9.30 a.m. and until 5.30 p.m.
McNaughton Room 113 at the University of Guelph
An evening of traditional Bolivian culture to follow.

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Guelph Wellington Health Coalition are presenting a townhall meeting on November 2 in War Memorial Hall at the University of Guelph regarding the impact of private health insurance on Medicare featuring guest speaker Marie-Claude Premont.

Marie-Claude Prémont is a law professor at École Nationale d’Administration Publique in Montréal, (National Public Administration School) . As well as being a member of the Quebec Bar Corporation of Quebec, she teaches and does research in the field of Health Law and Municipal Governance. She has been closely following the impact of the Chaoulli 2005 Supreme Court decision concerning private health insurance and delivery. What does this mean for Medicare and the sustainability of the Canada Health Act?

Politics Medicare And The Law: Chaoulli v. Quebec
Tuesday, November 2, 2010 at 7.00 p.m.
War Memorial Hall
(Corner of College Avenue and Gordon Street, Guelph, Ontario)

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Friends of the Guelph Public Library are busy preparing for their fourth annual giant book sale to be held Friday, October 29 through Sunday, October 31. This year’s location, the former FastForms building at Massey and Imperial Roads, offers extensive sorting and sales space, convenient bus access and plenty of free parking.

  • Books, Hardcover & Softcover: Children’s books, Cookbooks, Coffee Table Books, Foreign Language, Comic Books
  • Media: VHS Videos, DVDs, CDs, Audiobooks
  • Music:  Sheet music: CDs, DVDs
  • Puzzles & Games: Complete Jigsaw puzzles, Board games, Handheld electronic games

The Friends, a group of community volunteers, are committed to supporting the Guelph Public Library through advocacy and special programs. Proceeds of approximately $40,000 from earlier sales are invested toward a Friends project to serve children and young adults in the future new Main Library.

Friends of the GPL Fourth Annual Giant Book Sale
30,000 books and counting
Halloween Weekend, October 29 – 31
Friday evening: 6 – 9 p.m
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m
Sunday afternoon: 12 noon – 4 p.m

The sale will take place in the former FastForms building, 251 Massey Rd at Imperial Rd., in the business park to the west of the Hanlon Expressway.

Get Directions

For additional information, visit the Friends website at www.friendsguelphlibrary.ca.

Catch Virginia Gilham from Friends of the Guelph Public Library talking about their 2010 Book Sale on CFRU93.3fm ‘s Royal City Rag on Saturday October 23 between 9-10 a.m.

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During the week of October 18 – 24, Guelph will join others from around the world to mark Open Access Week.

Open Access Week is an annual international initiative designed to promote and advance changes in access to information. A global event now entering its fourth year, it provides an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access.

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

Guelph Voices of Open Access
Should scholarly research be freely accessible online to everyone?
October 21 from 3 – 5 p.m.
10 Carden Street, Guelph, Ontario

Whether you imagine a researcher seeking to reach scholars in developing countries, a community practitioner needing up-to-date data, or a recent university graduate seeking scholarly information on a topic, it becomes easy to see how free online access to peer-reviewed scientific information and discoveries benefi­ts our communities and society as a whole.

Guelph Voices of Open Access will connect scholars and community members to this global movement that seeks free open sharing of research ­findings.

Speakers include:

  • Mike Ridley: Chief Information Officer, Chief Librarian, University of Guelph
  • Beverley Hale: Associate Dean, Ontario Agricultural College, Professor, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph
  • Ajay Heble: Professor, School of English and Theatre Studies, University of Guelph, Artistic Director, The Guelph Jazz Festival, Project Director, Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice
  • Sarah Hook: PhD Candidate, Animal & Poultry Science, University of Guelph
  • Sarah Haanstra: Social Planning Director, United Way

Talks will be followed by discussions and refreshments.

Space is limited so be sure to RSVP to: researchshop@uoguelph.ca. Unfortunately, this venue is not wheelchair accessible.

There will also be three noon hour lectures at the  University of Guelph Library in the Florence Partridge Room 384:

  • Open Access 101 – Exploring the background and concepts of the open access movement.
    Monday October 18, 2010, Noon -1.00 p.m.
  • Creative Commons Licence – What is it? How do we use it?
    Tuesday October 19, 2010, Noon – 1.00 p.m.
  • The Google Book Settlement – What does this mean for Canadian authors?
    Wednesday October 20, 2010, Noon – 1.00 p.m.

For more information visit: www.openaccessweek.org.

Catch Wayne Johnston, Head of Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication at the University of Guelph Library talking about Open Access Week on CFRU93.3fm ‘s Royal City Rag on Saturday October 16 between 8-9 a.m.

Royal City Rag, Saturdays 8-10 a.m. on CFRU93.3fm in Guelph. Remember if you don’t catch Royal City Rag live, you can always pick it up later that day via the CFRU archive or here, on the blog, a day or so later.

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For more information, visit Guelph Wellington Local Food.

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There is a party in Wolfond Park on September 26.

This neighborhood event starts at 1.00 p.m. and runs till 6.00 p.m.

A great opportunity to meet your neighbours while helping tidy up a great neighborhood park. 

Featured events include:
1.oo p.m. Trees – weeding and mulching
3.00 p.m. Soccer and Viking Game
5.00 p.m. POT LUCK SUPPER – Litterless
6.00 p.m. Music and Dancing
 
They are also running a competition to come up with a GREAT name for the neighbourhood info-pole at the corner of Arthur and Norwich….. The winner will be announced at the Party. Great prizes !

Send you entries to:   joanne.astley@gmail.com
  
Bring along:   shovels, pails, wheelbarrows, FOOD to share, DRINKS to share, CHAIRS, BLANKETS, Plates, Cutlery, Servers, Cups…..The event is to be litterless.

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The third Fresh Water Jamboree takes place this Saturday, August 7, from noon to 11 p.m. at the Riverside Park Bandshell.

The Fresh Water Jamboree is a free, annual one-day music festival established to help raise awareness about “fresh water” in Wellington County, the province of Ontario and across Canada. Be The Artist, a Guelph-based organization that promotes musicians and environmental initiatives, launched Guelph’s first “green” music festival in 2008.

“We’re expecting to see 600 or 700 people at the event this year,” says festival organizer Chris Williams. “We’ve had so many local musicians and artistic communities become involved in this event, it’s quite exciting.  The Fresh Water Jamboree was created to help bring focus and awareness to our depleting fresh water supply, and also to help promote local musicians and artists.”

The day-long event will feature musical performances by Sam Turton, Peter Slack, Carmela, Mike Sharp and many more. A presentation about  the importance of fresh water by Wellington Waterwatchers, with support from The City of Guelph, will take place at 7.00 p.m. Food and refreshments will also be available.

The water in Canada is at risk. We need to act now before it is too late. Our water resources are being depleted so fast that the possibility of no water resources here in Canada could become a reality. There are many countries that have been getting water from our resources and there are many more companies and countries who are in need because they don’t have fresh water in their own country. We need to act locally and think globally.
www.wellingtonwaterwatchers.ca

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Hillside is here… well, just about. The festival takes place from July 23-25 at Guelph Lake.

Headliners Calexico, Laura Marling, and The Hidden Cameras will be kicking off the festival on the Friday night at the Main Stage! Also be sure not to miss out on Brasstronaut, First Rate People, Flashlight Radio, or Guelph’s own Minotaurs!

Then come and enjoy the Saturday featuring great acts throughout the day like Los Lobos, Sarah Harmer, Japandroids, Jason Collett, Basia Bulat, The Acorn, The Canned Goods, Harry Manx, The Good Lovelies, and that’s just for starters

And finally, we’ll say ‘Goodbye’ to the festival on Sunday with Stars, Gord Downie and The Country of Miracles, Easy Star All-Stars, Shad, Hayley Sales, Alex Cuba, Corb Lund, The Skeletones Four and a whole bunch more!

Check out the full schedule of performances and workshops HERE

If you are still trying to get a ticket, Friday and Sunday passes are available at Hillside ticket outlets Ground Floor Music in Guelph, Encore Records in Kitchener and Soundscapes in Toronto as well as online via TicketPro. The first 500 seniors can get weekend passes for just $49.50!

Although weekend passes are long gone you may be able to track one down via Kijiji or Craigslist.

Ticket prices are:

  • Friday – $49 + HST
  • Saturday – $69 + HST
  • Sunday $99 + HST
  • Seniors $99 + HST however, the first 500 seniors to purchase a weekend pass will receive a half price rate of $49.50 + HST

Culture vulture Marie Zimmerman, currently the executive director at the Hillside Festival, will be joining us on CFRU 93.3fm’s Royal City Rag Saturday July 17 between 8-9 a.m.

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Art On The Street takes place in downtown Guelph on Saturday, July 17 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Art on the street turns the spotlight on some of the fabulous talent within the local visual arts community. Over 70 artists will showcase their works in temporary, open-air studios which will line both sides of Quebec Street.

Changes for 2010 include a new partnership between the Downtown Guelph Business Association and Guelph Arts Council to host this year’s event, and the generous presence of Guelph School of Art in the children’s area.

To see a list of this year’s artists, visit downtownguelph.com.

Also check out Friday noon’s downtown musical artist Nabi in St George’s Square. You’ll not be disappointed!

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This event was in danger of slipping past without any fanfare. Sounds like it should be a great show.

SATURDAY, JULY 10, 2010
PEACEFEST – a day of celebration & music
Riverside Park Bandshell
Woolwich St., N., Guelph
FREE

A sensually rich event full of art, music, spoken word, poetry, organic food, craft/clothing/business vendors, drum circles, workshops, face-painting, henna tattooing, networking, fundraising, peacebuilding, and more!

This event is for those who care about creating an environmentally sustainable, socially just, spiritually fulfilling presence on earth, for those who know that these movements, our planet, and we ourselves are all interconnected. Through joining together and uniting good intentions with creativity we can only speed up our progress to peace and health for all.

Peacefest Guelph is a catalyst, a hub and our playground…lets have fun changing the world!

Performances:
11.30 a.m. Theo Simms, 12.30 a.m. Shannon Kingsbury & Andrew McPherson, 1.30 p.m. Heidi Ann Crocini, 2.00 p.m. Tomy Bewick, 3.00 Charlotte Fielden, 3.45 p.m. Nabi Loney, 4.30 p.m. Dennis Gaumond, 5.30 p.m. Jenikz, 6.45 p.m. Sam Turton & Jane Lewis with special guests, 7.45 p.m. Prince Bamibele Bajowa

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The Guelph Chapter of the Council of Canadians invites you to a Dialogue on Degrowth at 10 Carden on Tuesday June 29 at 6.00 p.m. Tapas and drinks will be served at 6.00 p.m. followed by a presentation featuring video clips from the recent “degrowth” conferences in Vancouver and Barcelona.

According to Wikipedia, Degrowth is a movement that advocates a downscaling of production and consumption, leading to the contraction of economies. Over-consumption is believed to be at the root of long term environmental issues and social inequalities. Proponents of degrowth believe that reducing consumption should not require individual martyrdom or a decrease in well-being. Advocates aim to maximize happiness and well-being by non-consumptive means – sharing work, consuming less, while devoting more time to art, music, family, culture and community.

At the individual level, degrowth is achieved by voluntary simplicity. Global solutions, for ‘degrowthists’, involve a relocalization of economic activities in order to end humanity’s dependence on fossil fuels and reduce its ecological imprint.

Degrowth opposes sustainable development because, while sustainable development aims to address environmental concerns, it does so with the goal of promoting economic growth which has failed to improve the lives of people and inevitably leads to environmental degradation. In this way, degrowth stands in sharp contrast to current forms of productivist capitalism that consider the accumulation of capital and commodities a desirable end.

Sounds like a very interesting concept… though I really dislike the term ‘degrowth’. However, many of us have been advocating for this for a long, long time. It’s great to see if gaining momentum.

The discussion will be followed by the election of the Council of Canadians Guelph Chapter 2010-2011 steering committee. A number of positions on the steering committee are still open. CoC members, that have a bit of extra time to devote to chapter activities, are encouraged to stand for election.

Degrowth: What Is It? Will It Help Create Happier Sustainable Cities?
When:  Tuesday, June 29 from 6.00 – 7.30 p.m.
Where:  10 Carden Street  Downtown Guelph
Admission:  free (though donations will be gratefully accepted)

Note that this meeting will be followed by a meeting of the Guelph Wellington Health Coalition:

June 29, 2010 at 7.30 p.m.
How the Community Health Centre Works For You
Dr. Lori Hasulo, Guelph General Practitioner at the Guelph Community Health Centre
Learn more about the wealth of services available in this type of healthcare delivery model.

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Nathalie Mehra, Director Ontario Health Coalition

The Guelph Wellington Health Coalition has a series of Town Hall meetings at 10 Carden St under the banner Community Health Is Everything.

June 22, 2010 at 7.00 p.m.
Change In Our Hospitals, Nursing Homes And Retirement Homes – Time To Speak Out
Natalie Mehra, Director of the Ontario Health Coalition
How changes in the provincial model of health care delivery will impact Hospitals, Nursing Homes and Retirement Homes, and expected outcomes

June 29, 2010 at 7.30 p.m.
How the Community Health Centre Works For You
Dr. Lori Hasulo, Guelph General Practitioner at the Guelph Community Health Centre
Learn more about the wealth of services available in this type of healthcare delivery model.

The Guelph Wellington Health Coalition is an associate chapter of the Ontario Health Coalition dedicated “to the protection and extension of a universal one-tier public Medicare system”. Our members represent all healthcare sectors as well as many grass root organizations who are deeply concerned about losing the right to universal healthcare for all, a right guaranteed in law by the Canada Health Act of 1984.

For more information on Guelph Wellington Health Coalition call 519-767-0084.

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The Out On The Shelf Garage Sale takes place on Saturday, June 19, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Harcourt Memorial United Church at 87 Dean Ave. in Guelph.

Out On The Shelf (OOTS) is a library and resource centre for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender communities and their allies in Guelph and the surrounding area.

“The garage sale has brought in over $3000 over the last three years. We put that money directly toward our operating costs, such as rent, phone and Internet. Last year, we had a bake sale, which brought in a quarter of our sales. Who could resist?” asks Sarah Dermer, OOTS’ Volunteer Coordinator.

“Every year the garage sale seems to get bigger and bigger.  I always leave with some great deals!” says Jerome Chang, member of the Garage Sale Committee.

As a primary fundraiser, the OOTS garage sale provides much-needed funding for the volunteer-run centre. While the centre is run by a dedicated group of volunteers, the organization must still raise funds for its operating expenses, like rent and utilities that are approximately $700 each month. OOTS is funded exclusively by fees for library memberships, private donations, and fundraisers like the OOTS Garage Sale.

The library has over 2500 items in its collection and over three thousand visits to its website each month. “There is no other community service like this in Guelph,” notes Lori Guest, a long-time OOTS volunteer.

Opened in 2005 after two years of planning, OOTS serves the local community by providing LGBT-focused materials from its lending library, and by hosting social groups and events.

When asked what she enjoys most about the OOTS Garage Sale, Linda Collins replies, “Bargains! The treasures I find are the best. And I love helping at the OOTS Garage Sale with my daughter and her partner. I feel proud to be a part of the Garage Sale – it is a fun way to help a good cause. It’s an awesome day!”

For more on Out On The Shelf visit www.outontheshelf.ca.

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Clearcutting on the Carson Reid Property, June 2009

Like to prevent developers clearcutting trees whenever they feel like it? Like to ensure that people have a better understanding of all the important benefits mature trees provide for our health and community?

Then you need to help ensure that the City of Guelph drafts as strong a bylaw as possible.

Guelph citizens have now been waiting for a new stronger protective tree bylaw for over 20 years. In the meantime we continue to lose canopy. Guelph’s urban forest canopy sits at 25%, while the desired level  is 40%.

Unfortunately the 1986 tree bylaw (view) said it was an offence to injure or destroy any living tree in the City of Guelph but did very little to actually protect them.

Like to make sure that this one actually protects urban trees?

The new bylaw (view the draft) has to be much better, but it still needs public input to make sure that it is truly protective.

The City of Guelph has held one workshop  (June 3) on the new tree bylaw and has another planned  for June 8. The workshop takes place at City Hall, 1 Carden St. in Meeting Room C from 7–9 p.m. Following a presentation by city staff, participants will have an opportunity to discuss issues and provide feedback. Remember that even if you can’t attend the sessions, you can still comment. Comments will be received until June 18. To ensure that the decision makers are aware of your concerns, comments should be sent to city council as well as staff.

View the draft Tree By-law

The following message is from Guelph Urban Forest Friends and concerns the draft version of the updated tree bylaw.

Hello GUFF supporters,

The City has drafted a tree bylaw and is holding workshops for discussion and input:  The next workshop is on June 8, from 7-9 p.m. in Conference Room C at City Hall. We urge you to attend or provide written comments by June 18.

Guelph Urban Forest Friends (GUFF) has reviewed the draft tree bylaw.  It is an improvement over the existing 25-year-old bylaw and requires that permits be obtained for destroying trees over 20 cm in diameter on small properties and trees over 10 cm in diameter on large properties.  Even so, it is still much weaker than some other tree by-laws in Ontario.  There are a number of areas that need to be stronger:

1. The foundation of the bylaw should be that healthy trees of a certain size should be protected.  The City of Toronto bylaw states this clearly:  “The Commissioner shall not issue a permit for the injury or destruction of trees where trees are healthy.”  813-15C.

Admittedly, the Toronto bylaw does allow exemptions for the destruction of healthy trees under certain circumstances–such as when they are within the building envelope of a proposed building.  But the importance of an affirmative policy protecting healthy trees cannot be underestimated.

2. The draft Guelph bylaw gives too much discretion in deciding whether to issue a permit to destroy trees.   A city inspector would have to “consider” such things as whether the tree is an endangered species, the condition and location of the tree, whether it is important for erosion and flood control, whether there are breeding birds present. Instead, the by-law should contain a section entitled “PERMIT REFUSED” that itemizes reasons for which a permit must be denied.

Those reasons should include:  that the tree is an endangered or threatened species; that the tree is healthy; that environmentally sensitive areas will not be adequately protected; that erosion or flood control will be negatively impacted; that significant vistas will not be protected and preserved; that the tree is a heritage tree; that removing the tree would violate the Migratory Bird Act.  Such language is consistent with the Toronto and Richmond Hill tree bylaws.

3. Guelph’s tree bylaw should include mandatory parameters for issuing permits for destroying trees.  As in #2 above, the draft by-law gives too much discretion in imposing the conditions on the permit.  The by-law only requires that the “inspector may make the Permit subject to such conditions as the Inspector may consider necessary. The Inspector “may” require replacement trees; the inspector “may” require cash in lieu of tree replacement; the inspector “may” require that specific measures be implemented to mitigate effects on nearby trees, land, water bodies or natural areas.”

The Toronto tree bylaw, in contrast, states that “A permit to destroy trees SHALL be subject to the following terms and conditions:”  Those conditions include such things as tree replacement and cash in lieu.

4. Guelph’s draft tree bylaw should require that whenever trees are proposed to be removed, impacts to surrounding properties (such as loss of shade, vistas or privacy) have to be considered.  This is consistent with a provision in the Richmond Hill tree bylaw.

To summarize, the draft bylaw should:

  • state that, except for certain exemptions, permits shall not be issued to destroy healthy trees over 20 cm in diameter (10 cm on large properties)
  • itemize reasons for which permits must be denied (e.g. trees are healthy, endangered, of heritage quality, etc.)
  • establish mandatory conditions for obtaining a permit to destroy trees (e.g. replacement trees must be planted)
  • require that impacts on adjoining properties be considered (e.g. loss of shade, privacy)

Thanks from GUFF

About the draft Tree Bylaw
In addition to regulating trees 10 centimetres at breast height on lots larger than 0.2 hectares (0.5 acres), the updated draft bylaw proposes to regulate damage or removal of larger trees on smaller properties; trees 20 centimetres in diameter at breast height on lots less than 0.2 hectares (0.5 acres). The updated draft also includes a permit process, a list of exemptions, entry and inspection powers, enforcement measures and increased fines.

Following a presentation, participants will have an opportunity to discuss issues and provide feedback. Even if you can’t attend the sessions, you can still comment. Comments will be received until June 18.

Suzanne Young, Environmental Planner
519-837-5616 x 2356
suzanne.young@guelph.ca

Jessica McEachren, Environmental Planner
519-837-5616 x 2563
jessica.mceachren@guelph.ca

Contacting Guelph City Council

Mayor Farbridge: mayor@guelph.ca

Ward 1: Bob Bell bob.bell@guelph.ca, Kathleen Farrelly kathleen.farrelly@guelph.ca
Ward 2: Vicki Beard vicki.beard@guelph.ca, Ian Findlay ian.findlay@guelph.ca
Ward 3: Maggie Laidlaw maggie.laidlaw@guelph.ca, June Hofland june.hofland@guelph.ca
Ward 4: Gloria Kovach gloria.kovach@guelph.ca, Mike Salisbury mike.salisbury@guelph.ca
Ward 5: Lise Burcher lise.burcher@guelph.ca, Leanne Piper leanne.piper@guelph.ca
Ward 6: Christine Billings christine.billings@guelph.ca, Karl Wettstein karl.wettstein@guelph.ca

Don’t know your ward? Click here to see the map

Guelph Urban Forest Friends have been advocating for our urban trees, including a stronger protective tree bylaw and a separate urban forestry department with a certified forester to more effectively manage tree maintenance and coordinate public education on the value of our mature trees.

For more on Guelph Urban Forest Friends, please visit www.guffguelph.ca.

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Did you know that the average family is exposed to 72,000 different chemicals?

Catch Andrew Niskar’s latest film, Chemerical at 10 carden on June 10 @ 7:30 p.m. and learn more about the toxic soup we live in.

Following the screening there will be a discussion about how we can all decrease our toxin exposure.

As only 45 place are available for this screening so it is best to reserve in advance.

Reserve your seat online

Suggested donation of $5.00 at the door. All proceeds will go to support 10 Carden.

Filmmaker Andrew Nisker puts a new spin on the story of how we treat our planet in his latest film Chemerical. He asks a family to purge their home of everyday chemicals and adopt a chemical-free lifestyle. Chemerical then takes the audience on an eye-opening journey through the lifecycle of everyday chemicals the family uses.

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The City of Guelph has scheduled another community meeting on June 17 to discuss the proposed Downtown Guelph growth plan.

The stated goal is to develop a community where people can live, work and enjoy the beauty and culture in the centre of the city.

The question will be whether that can possibly be a reality with the amount of growth the city and, in particular, the downtown will be expected to accept under the provincial growth plan, Places To Grow.

According to the press release, the areas of focus will include the portions of the Ward neighbourhood included in the Downtown Secondary Plan study area and the proposed urban design principles to be incorporated into the plan for future developments including the W.C. Woods 1 site. e.g. protected views, heritage and historic features etc.

It seems that the community concerns about the size of the two condominium buildings (16 floors) planned for the WC Woods site at the corner of Arthur and Elizabeth are getting the planners attention.

The city would like participants to register by June 10, if possible. Don’t let that date deter you from attending, though.

Call 519-837-5616 or e-mail downtownplan@guelph.ca to register.

You can view the components of the downtown plan HERE.

As the City has now stated that it will not make a decision on the Woods Condominium project until after the municipal election in October ( i.e. councillors cannot be turfed out for four years if you dislike their decision!) it is very important to make your voice heard NOW. You should also find out where all candidates in the coming election stand on this issue.

Few people in Guelph seem to understand how much growth the city is expected to absorb over the coming years. By 2031, under Places To Grow, Guelph’s population will grow from 105,000 to a staggering 165,000. Places to Grow mandates intensification within current limits which is why the downtown is particularly targeted for growth.

The city claims that this huge amount of growth will be sustainable. Unfortunately we will have to wait until the growth has taken place to know whether they were right or not.

As the pace of change is likely to be rapid, it is important to have your say now.

Tuesday, June 17 from 6.30-8.30 p.m.
Italian Canadian Club
135 Ferguson St.

About the Downtown Secondary Plan
The City of Guelph is preparing a new Secondary Plan for downtown Guelph as shown on the map. The area is a provincially designated Urban Growth Centre and includes lands in the Ward neighbourhood.

The Plan will govern residential and commercial development, natural and heritage conservation, and the city’s transportation and energy systems in downtown Guelph.

For more information:
David de Groot, Urban Designer
Community Design and Development Services
T 519-837-5616 x 2358
E david.degroot@guelph.ca
guelph.ca/downtownplan

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Large Elm Tree

It seems that the City of Guelph is finally moving towards approval of a new tree bylaw.

Guelph citizens have now been waiting for a new stronger protective tree bylaw for over 19 years. In the meantime we continue to lose canopy. Guelph’s urban forest canopy sits at 25%, while the desired level  is 40%.

Unfortunately the 1986 tree bylaw (view) said it was an offence to injure or destroy any living tree in the City of Guelph  but did very little to actually protect them.

Like to make sure that this one actually protects urban trees?

The new bylaw (view the draft) has to be much better, but it still needs public input to make sure that it is truly protective.

Please arrange to attend one of two workshops the City of Guelph is holding to allow the community to provide input on proposed changes.

The workshops take place on Thursday, June 3 and Tuesday, June 8 in City Hall, 1 Carden St., Meeting Room C from 7–9 p.m.

About the draft Tree Bylaw
In addition to regulating trees 10 centimetres at breast height on lots larger than 0.2 hectares (0.5 acres), the updated draft bylaw proposes to regulate damage or removal of larger trees on smaller properties; trees 20 centimetres in diameter at breast height on lots less than 0.2 hectares (0.5 acres). The updated draft also includes a permit process, a list of exemptions, entry and inspection powers, enforcement measures and increased fines.

Following a presentation, participants will have an opportunity to discuss issues and provide feedback.

View the draft Tree By-law

Even if you can’t attend the sessions, you can still comment. Comments will be received until June 18.

Suzanne Young, Environmental Planner
519-837-5616 x 2356
suzanne.young@guelph.ca 

Jessica McEachren, Environmental Planner
519-837-5616 x 2563
jessica.mceachren@guelph.ca

Guelph Urban Forest Friends have been advocating for our urban trees, including a stronger protective tree bylaw and a separate urban forestry department with a certified forester to more effectively manage tree maintenance and coordinate public education on the value of our mature trees.

For more on Guelph Urban Forest Friends, please visit www.guffguelph.ca.

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Speed River Clean Up, June 12 –  Volunteer Opportunities

For the past thirty one years, in June every year, members of the Guelph community have gathered to clean up the Speed River. The 2010 Speed River Clean Up will be held on Saturday, June 12 at 8.30 a.m. at Royal City Park (on Gordon Street, across from the Boathouse).

The Ontario Public Interest Research Group (OPIRG) – Guelph is looking forward to another fun, successful event as a part of Canadian Rivers Day!

OPIRG would like to invite back all of the dedicated volunteers that have helped with the clean-up in the past, and also to roll out the welcome mat for all members of the local community to join in this worthwhile effort. 

After the clean-up there will be an open mic, to showcase some of our amazing local talent… and a 100 mile potluck at the McCrae House Museum on Water Street. All are encouraged to bring and share your favourite local and home-made dishes with your neighbours and community members.  All participants will be entered into a draw for The Woolwich Arrow and Creemore Springs Speed River Dinner!

If you would like to just help out with the actual clean-up (picking up grabage etc.), you don’t need to sign up before hand – just show up at 8.30 a.m. on the day in Royal City Park.

If you would like to sign up for specific volunteer opportunities (below) please contact OPIRG-Guelph by June 3 at 519-824-2091 or opirgguelphvolunteer@gmail.com.

Friday Set-Up Volunteers (2 people)
When: 2:00– 6:00pm
Load up the vehicles at the OPIRG office, last minute errands, start the set-up.

Morning Set-Up Volunteers (2 people)
When: 7:30–10:00am (free to help out in other areas after this)
Put up signs, organize hip waders, garbage bags, crew leader kits, free coffee and breakfast food, etc.

Morning Greeters (2 people)
When: 8:00–10:00am (free to help out in other areas after this)
Sit at the Registration table, assign participants to crews, and answer questions.

Crew Leaders (12 people)
When: 8:30am – 12:00/12:30pm (join us for the BBQ afterwards)
Walking with the “crews”(of up to 20 people) to a pre-arranged section of the river and supervising the picking up of garbage (as well as picking up garbage yourselves).  You are also responsible for writing down the names of the people in your group and recording interesting objects they retrieve from the river.  (Please note: Crew Leaders must be at least 19 years old.)  Please let staff know beforehand if you’d like to sign up for a particular river sector and it you will be bringing a vehicle that you’d like to use.  Nature interpretation skills are an asset, but definitely not necessary. OPIRG-Guelph will be holding a pre-clean-up tour to give you an orientation to the river, it’s ecology, history and health. 

Lunch Volunteers (2 People)
When: 10:30-2:00pm (you can do this as well as morning setup or greeter if you’d like)
Help set up lunch items, serve food, hand out door prize tickets and help with the take down after the event.

Afternoon Take-Down Volunteers (4 people)
When: 1:00-4:00pm
Help clean up and return supplies to OPIRG-Guelph.

Photography Volunteers
When: 8.30 a.m.-1.30 p.m.
Enjoy taking pictures? Why not take photos of Guelphites cleaning their community?

General Clean-Up Volunteers
When 8.30 – 11:30 a.m.
Remove garbage from the river and the riverbanks!  You can sign up before hand, or just show to register in Royal City Park on the day. You will also be able to enjoy a Community 100 mile Potluck Lunch afterwards in the grounds of the McCrae House Museum.

Local Performers
When:12.30 – 2.00 p.m.
Entertain the hard working clean-up volunteers while they snack and mingle!  We want you to jump up on our open stage and showcase the amazing talent that this city has to offer.  Anything goes!  Poetry, acoustic instruments, or whatever you do best is welcome!

Please contact OPIRG-Guelph by June 3 at 519-824-2091 or opirgguelphvolunteer@gmail.com to sign up for any of these positions.

For more information, please visit www.opirgguelph.org.

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The Guelph Chapter of the Council of Canadians are presenting a very special Canadian Environment Week panel discussion on Growth, Gravel and Groundwater and the threats facing our community on June 3 a 7 p.m. The townhall style meeting takes place at Harcourt Memorial United Church, 87 Dean Ave, Guelph, ON

An expert panel featuring members of Gravel Watch, Grand River Environmental Network, FORCE (Friends of Rural Communities and the Environment), CARRA (Cranberry Area Ratepayers and Residents Association),  North Dufferin Agriculture and Community Taskforce (opposing the giant quarry above Luther Marsh, at the top of Grand River headwaters) and local hydrologist Hugh Whiteley will discuss the impact of quarries, pipelines, roads and new development on our future sustainability within the city and Grand River watershed.

Unfortunately the ever increasing demand for gravel, limestone and concrete for more and bigger roads and new-builds is taking precedence over prime agricultural land, and our local water security.

It is also important to note that although a pipeline to Lake Erie is not currently being considered for Guelph, discussions about a pipeline have been continuing with other communities in the region.

The panel discussion will be followed by a question and answer session.

Growth, Gravel and Groundwater – A Panel Discussion On The Imminent Threats Facing Our Community
When: June 3 a 7 p.m.
Where: Harcourt Memorial United Church,87 Dean Ave, Guelph, ON
Free (Donations gratefully accepted)

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The City of Guelph is inviting community members to attend an open house on April 27 to share ideas about how Downtown Guelph should grow and change.

The stated goal is to develop a community where people can live, work and enjoy the beauty and culture in the centre of the city.

The question will be whether that can possibly be a reality with the amount of growth the city and, in particular, the downtown will be expected to accept under the provincial growth plan, Places To Grow.

Few people in Guelph seem to understand how much growth the city is expected to absorb over the coming years. By 2031, under Places To Grow, Guelph’s population will grow from 105,000 to a staggering 165,000. Places to Grow mandates intensification within current limits which is why the downtown is particularly targeted for growth.

The city claims that this huge amount of growth will be sustainable. Unfortunately we will have to wait until the growth has taken place to know whether they were right or not.

As the pace of change is likely to be rapid, it is important to have your say now.

The Envision Guelph Downtown open house will focus, in particular, on the Ward neighbourhood east of Speed River as part of the City’s Downtown Secondary Plan. After a presentation participants will be invited to review and comment on the draft directions for the plan.

Tuesday, April 27
6.30-8.30 p.m. (presentation at 7 p.m.)
Italian Canadian Club
135 Ferguson St.

About the Downtown Secondary Plan
The City of Guelph is preparing a new Secondary Plan for downtown Guelph as shown on the map. The area is a provincially designated Urban Growth Centre and includes lands in the Ward neighbourhood.

The Plan will govern residential and commercial development, natural and heritage conservation, and the city’s transportation and energy systems in downtown Guelph.

For more information:
David de Groot, Urban Designer
Community Design and Development Services
T 519-837-5616 x 2358
E david.degroot@guelph.ca
guelph.ca/downtownplan

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Hanlon Creek Site Entrance (Photo: Bob Grodon)

Following up on Friday’s press conference decrying the $5 million SLAPP suit initiated by the  City of Guelph and Belmont Equity against five individuals who occupied the Hanlon Creek lands last summer, the self-styled Defenders of the Hanlon Creek Watershed are hosting a free public meeting on April 29 at Ed. Video, 40 Baker St.

Participants in last summer’s action, including some of the defendents in the SLAPP suit, will be discussing what happened, why it was significant and most importantly what to do next.

According to a press release sent out by The Defenders of Hanl0n Creek Watershed:

Recent news coverage has shown that once again that the City of Guelph is trying to evade responsibility for protecting an environmentally sensitive area by applying to the Ministry of Natural Resources for an exemption “to harm Jefferson Salamanders and to damage potential their habitat.

This follows what happened last summer, when the Superior Court awarded the land occupiers an injunction for defending the public interest, and forced the City to hold off on development of the Hanlon Creek Business Park.

Since then the City and Belmont Equity have pursued a SLAPP suit against five individuals for up to $5 million.  This is an unrealistic and absurd amount of money, the real intent being to intimidate people into silence and inaction.

The Defenders of the Hanlon Creek are hoping people will come out to share ideas and develop an action plan to continue the fight against the development of the envioronmentally sensitive area.

For more information, visit www.hcbpoccupation.wordpress.com and www.hanloncreek5.woprdpress.com.

Thursday April 29, 7  p.m.

Ed Video, 40 Baker St., downtown Guelph

Wheelchair Accessible

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Guelph Arts Council Historical Walking Tours 2010 – Start April 25

"The Ward" tour, June 2009 (courtesy Guelph Arts Council)

Spring is in the air these days, and that means it’s just about time for the start of Guelph Arts Council’s popular annual walking tours.  These guided tours, which are offered on selected Sundays between April 25 and October 17, trace Guelph’s heritage through its architecture, its people, and the stories that contribute to this City’s unique character.

There are normally six Guelph Arts Council walking tours, each of which explores a different area of historic Guelph, although, this year, Where Guelph Began, which encircles the original Market Square area laid out by John Galt in 1827, will not be offered because of construction and road closures in that area of the City. 

The other five  tours offered in 2010 include:

  • Downtown Walkabout which covers Guelph’s current Downtown
  • The Slopes of the Speed which explores the slopes of the Speed River where many of Guelph’s largest and most distinguished historic homes are located
  • Altar and Hearth which covers the area west of Downtown and includes several historic stone churches and many historic homes representing a variety of architectural styles
  • Brooklyn and the College Hill  which focuses on one of Guelph’s early industrial sections on the south side of the Speed River, as well as the area that developed around the Ontario Agricultural College
  • Ward One Guelph  which covers the area southeast of the downtown, between the Speed and Eramosa Rivers, and features a diversity of historic architecture and the diversity of peoples who formed Guelph.

All tours start at 2 p.m. from different locations.  They take about two hours to complete and cost $3 per person. Tour booklets are available for $5 each at the Guelph Arts Council office and several other retail locations.

For other information, please contact the Guelph Arts Council office at 147 Wyndham Street North, Suite 404, Guelph, or phone (519) 836-3280; Fax (519) 766-9212; email gac@sentex.net.

 

Guelph Arts Council Historical Walking Tours 2010 

Tour I:  Where Guelph Began
This tour encircles the original Market Square area of almost twenty-four acres laid out by John Galt in 1827.  Serving as the focal point for Guelph’s early social and business life, the area also contains the sites of many of Guelph’s first buildings.
Dates:  Due to street construction and numerous road closures, this tour will not be offered during 2010.

Tour II:  Downtown Walkabout
The present downtown centre of Guelph, with its wide main street, provides a compact walking tour which includes many buildings and sites of considerable historical and architectural interest. 
Dates:  April 25, May 30, August 15, September 19                Time: 2 p.m
Starts:  Guelph Civic Museum, 6 Dublin Street South, Guelph
Cost:    $3 per person.  (Fee does NOT include admission to Guelph Museums)
 
Tour III:  The Slopes Of the Speed
This tour explores the slopes of the Speed River between Norwich and Macdonell Streets, where many of Guelph’s largest and most distinguished historic homes are located. 
Dates:  May 2, June 6, August 22, September 26               Time: 2 p.m
Starts:  Guelph Public Library, 100 Norfolk Street, Guelph
Cost:    $3 per person. 
 
Tour IV:  Altar And Hearth in Victorian Guelph
This tour provides a glimpse of the Victorian era in Guelph.  Covering the area west of Norfolk Street, between Essex Street and London Road, the tour includes several historic stone churches and many historic homes representing a variety of architectural styles.
NOTE: This tour is offered in two parts [(lower) and (upper)] on alternating dates.
Dates:  May 9 (lower), June 13 (upper), August 29 (lower), October 3 (upper)                Time: 2 p.m
Starts:  Tour (lower) Guelph Civic Museum, 6 Dublin Street South, Guelph
               Tour (upper) Guelph Public Library, 100 Norfolk Street, Guelph
Cost:    $3 per person.  (Fee does NOT include admission to Guelph Museums.)
 
Tour V:  Brooklyn And The College Hill
This tour takes participants to the south side of the Speed River to explore one of Guelph’s early industrial sections, formerly known as Brooklyn, as well as the College Hill area that developed around the Ontario Agricultural College.  The tour includes some of the city’s best examples of masonry and stone carving. 
Dates:  May 16, June 20, September 5, October 10                Time: 2 p.m
Starts:  McCrae House, 108 Water Street, Guelph
Cost:    $3 per person. (Fee does NOT include admission to Guelph Museums.)
 
Tour VI:  Ward One Guelph
This tour of the area southeast of the downtown, between the Speed and Eramosa Rivers, reveals the rich variety of historic architecture and the diversity of peoples who formed Guelph.  Particular attention is devoted to residential/industrial proximity and the city’s early Italian community.
Dates:  May 23, June 27, September 12, October 17                Time: 2 p.m
Starts:  Tytler School, Toronto Street entrance (off York Road near York Road Park)
Cost:    $3 per person.

For other information, please contact the Guelph Arts Council office at 147 Wyndham Street North, Suite 404, Guelph, or phone (519) 836-3280; Fax (519) 766-9212; email gac@sentex.net.

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Perusing plans and chatting with planners may seem like a rather dry way to spend an evening in Guelph but it is rather important.  Especially so, if you love the city you currently call home.

Few people in Guelph seem to understand how much growth the city is expected to absorb over the coming years.

By 2031, under the provincial growth plan, Places To Grow, Guelph’s population will grow from 105,000 to a staggering 165,000. All these people will need somewhere to live, never mind work.

Places to Grow mandates intensification within current limits which is why the downtown is targeted for growth however people elsewhere in the city should not think they will be spared development and intensification.

The city claims that this huge amount of growth will be sustainable. Unfortunately we will have to wait until the growth has taken place to know whether they were right or not.

There are more opportunities to see what the city has in mind at three open houses taking place this coming week.

 

Guelph’s Official Plan Update – Envision Guelph

The community is invited to review and share comments on the proposed update to Guelph’s Official Plan (OPA 42).

Open Houses
April 20, April 21, April 22 from  6.30–9.30 p.m.
City Hall, Meeting Room C

Public Meeting of City Council (rescheduled for May 20)
The community is also invited to make presentations to City Council regarding the proposed Official Plan update (OPA 42). on May 20 at 7 p.m. in the Council Chambers. Council will hear presentations but will not make a decision during this meeting.

About Guelph’s Official Plan
The Official Plan balances the city’s growth and development with its natural features and green spaces; it governs, where and how Guelph grows.

Updating the Official Plan
Proposed Official Plan Amendment No. 42 is the second phase of the City’s comprehensive Official Plan Update. Phase one of the Official Plan Update (Official Plan Amendment No. 39) was approved in 2009 and established a growth management framework for the City to the year 2031. Proposed OPA 42 addresses the detailed implementation of the City’s growth management framework and a range of other planning matters including natural heritage, urban design, cultural heritage, energy conservation, affordable housing, transportation and other community infrastructure.

Subject lands
The proposed changes apply to all land within the municipal boundaries of the City of Guelph.

Purpose and effect of the proposed amendment
The proposed Official Plan amendment addresses:

  • recent changes to Provincial legislation
  • consistency with the 2005 Provincial Policy Statement
  • policies to implement the growth management framework articulated through OPA 39
  • recommendations from Guelph’s recent Master Plans and studies.

If approved, proposed OPA 42 would:

  • Update the Official Plan organization
  • Identify the City’s Natural Heritage System for protection and promote restoration
  • Promote urban agriculture and community gardens
  • Set out requirements for energy conservation and sustainable design
  • Encourage and provide opportunities for renewable and alternative energy generation
  • Establish policies to ensure high quality urban design consistent with the directions approved in the City’s Urban Design Action Plan
  • Update the City’s transportation policies to provide a greater focus on transit, walking, cycling, transportation demand management and using rail for goods and people movement
  • Introduce new planning tools to achieve the objectives of the Official Plan, such as density bonusing, regulation of exterior building design through site plan control, and introduce a framework for that would allow the establishment of a development permit system in the future
  • Establish an affordable housing target and implementation measures
  • Provide greater certainty for infill and intensification within the built-up area of the City
  • Establish minimum and maximum heights and densities
  • Focus growth within Downtown, intensification corridors, and mixed use nodes that were identified in Official Plan Amendment No. 39 as well as along transit routes (e.g. arterial and collector streets).

How to provide comment
In order to address Guelph City Council during the Public Meeting on May 20, 2010, please contact the City Clerk’s Office by May 12, 2010 to register as a delegation.

If you are unable to attend the Public Meeting, please send your written comments no later than 4 p.m. May 12, 2010 to be added to the meeting agenda, or by 12 p.m. May 20, 2010 to be added to the addendum.

City Council will not be making a decision during the meeting. If you would like to be notified when Guelph City Council will make a decision on this matter, please submit your full name and mailing address in writing or complete the sign-in sheet at the public meeting.

Lois Giles, City Clerk
City Hall, 1 Carden St.
T 519-837-5603
E clerks@guelph.ca

Important information about making a submission
If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to Guelph City Council before OPA 42 is adopted, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision to the Ontario Municipal Board. If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, or make written submissions to Guelph City Council before the OPA 42 is adopted, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

For more on this and other community issues, tune into Royal City Rag, Saturdays 7-9 a.m. on CFRU 93.3fm. Speaking Truth To Power

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Doors Open Guelph – Guelph’s Finest Buildings Open Their Doors For Free Public Tours

On Saturday, April 24, Guelph residents and visitors will have the opportunity to participate in the annual celebration of the City’s history and architectural heritage.  Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., several of Guelph’s finest buildings, many of which are not normally open to the public, will open their doors for free public tours.  Guided tours will be available at each site, led by knowledgeable tour guides who will talk about the site’s history and important architectural features. Guides will also pass on some of the interesting stories associated with each site.
 
A joint undertaking of Guelph Arts Council, Heritage Guelph and City of Guelph Tourism Services, Doors Open Guelph 2010 is partnering for the first time with the Guelph Hiking Club which is offering its first Trails Open Hike to coincide with Doors Open.  The Guelph event is also part of Doors Open Ontario, an Ontario Heritage Trust province-wide initiative to celebrate community heritage.  Once again, the Guelph event has the distinction of launching the Ontario Doors Open season, among the first of more than 50 such events across the province.
 
For more information about sites and tours and some tips on how best to plan and enjoy the day, pick up a Doors Open Guelph 2010 brochure at various locations around the City (e.g Visitor Information Centre, Guelph Public Library, Guelph Civic Museum) or visit the Doors Open Guelph website at www.guelpharts.ca/doorsopenguelph; or contact Guelph Arts Council by telephone at (519) 836-3280, or e-mail gac@sentex.net.

Site descriptions and images, courtesy of Guelph Arts Council

Hammond Radio Museum                                                       
595 Southgate Drive (off Laird Road)
washrooms, accessible, parking
 
Founded in 1982 by Fred Hammond, one of the founding members of Guelph’s Hammond Manufacturing, the Radio Museum houses an extensive collection of rare and historically significant pieces. 

The 2000+ items exhibited reveal the development of radio throughout the past 100 years.  Included are crystal radios, early tabletop and broadcast, early wireless, military and Amateur Radio equipment. 
 
Homewood House                                                                                         
19 Woodycrest Drive (off Waterloo Avenue)
street parking

This Italianate-style house was built c. 1855 by J.J. Kingsmill. His son, Charles Kingsmill, was the first director of the Canadian Navy which is celebrating its centennial in 2010. 

Purchased by the current owner in 1984, this house has been lovingly restored, retaining many original features such as the entrance tower, interior shutters, stained glass windows and fireplace. 
 
Wellington Brewery                                                         
950 Woodlawn Road West
washrooms, accessible, parking

The oldest independent microbrewery in Canada, Wellington Brewery was founded early in 1985.  Since then, it has grown steadily, winning local and national awards for its time-honoured, traditional beers produced in small batches, using all-natural ingredients, a lot of care and patience. 

The brewing facility and the Iron Duke House will be part of the Doors Open Guelph tour.

The Frank Hasenfratz Centre of Excellence in Manufacturing, Linamar Corporation
700 Woodlawn Road West
washrooms, accessible, parking

Opened in September 2009, this state-of-the art centre is the home of innovative product and process technology.

The focal point of learning and leadership development to create a knowledgeable collaborative community, the facility features many eco-friendly design elements such as an open concept atrium foyer, retractable skylights, extensive use of recycled materials, a reflective pond and dual living walls.
 
Ignatius Jesuit Centre                                                                      
5420 Highway 6 North
washrooms, parking
 
Arriving in Guelph in 1852, the Jesuits helped build Church of Our Lady and other local parishes before establishing a novitiate on this site in 1913. The original building, destroyed by fire in 1954, was replaced by what is now called Orchard Park Centre.

A retreat centre, organic farm, labyrinth, willow dome, stations of the cosmos and walking trails complete this bucolic 600-acre setting.
 
St. Philopateer Coptic Orthodox Church                                         
Located at Ignatius Jesuit Centre
5420 Highway 6 North
washrooms, parking
 
Originally Ignatius Great Hall in Orchard Park Centre, this space has been transformed by liturgical art into the home of St. Philopateer Coptic Orthodox Church. 

The Copts (or Egyptians) are defined as the modern sons of the Pharaohs.  Their religious background helped them to eagerly accept Christianity and enjoy its depth through their ascetic life, meditation and studying of Holy Scripture. 

 

 

 

Woodlawn Cemetery Lodge, Woodlawn Memorial Park
760 Woolwich Street
washrooms, parking
 
This 1883 Vernacular Gothic brick structure was built as the home of the Union (now Woodlawn) Cemetery keepers, and remains so to this day.

Guelph architect John Day’s design fee for the lodge, a stable, greenhouse and coach house (still in use) was $58.  Especially attractive are the original oval front doors, mouldings, trim, hand-turned banister and interior window engravings. 
 
Islamic Society of Guelph                                                                  
126 Norwich Street East
accessible, parking
 
This attractive small church of non-conformist design, incorporating classical features, was built in 1856-57 for a group of Scottish Congregationalists, and is the second oldest of Guelph’s remaining stone church buildings. 

In 1882, it was sold to the Disciples of Christ who occupied it until 2008 when it was purchased by the Islamic Society of Guelph and converted to a mosque. 
 
Canadian Pacific Caboose 436994                                                           
Located on siding close to St. George’s Church (enter off Woolwich Street)
street parking
 
Built in 1941, this wooden-body caboose served the Canadian Pacific Railway for more than 40 years.  For the past 15 years, it has been and continues to be beautifully restored by members of the Guelph Historical Railway Association.  The inside is now a railway museum on wheels, reflecting the glory days of railroading in the mid-20th century.
 
Trails Open: The Radial Line Trail and the Guelph Escarpment         
Hikes start at Eramosa River Park (Lawrence Avenue off York Road west of Victoria)
parking
 
The Radial Line Trail is one of Ontario’s first rails-to-trails projects, completed by the Guelph Hiking Trail Club in 1971 to link Guelph to the Niagara Escarpment. But Guelph has its own Escarpment within the City, with fossilized coral reefs towering over the Trail in places.  Walk the railbed of the legendary, electric Toronto Suburban Railway and visit the site of Speedwell Station. 
 
40-minute hikes every hour on the hour until 3 p.m.; more challenging 90-minute hikes at 10.30 a.m. and 1.30 p.m. Bring suitable shoes for walking and dress for the weather.

For more information about sites and tours and some tips on how best to plan and enjoy the day, pick up a Doors Open Guelph 2010 brochure at various locations around the City (e.g Visitor Information Centre, Guelph Public Library, Guelph Civic Museum) or visit the Doors Open Guelph website at www.guelpharts.ca/doorsopenguelph; or contact Guelph Arts Council by telephone at (519) 836-3280, or e-mail gac@sentex.net.

Site descriptions and images, courtesy of Guelph Arts Council

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Cartoon by Khalil Bendib

Please note that this proposed panel discussion regarding SLAPP suits featuring Rebecca McNeil from Environmental Defence planned for April 12 has had to be postponed. It is hoped to reschedule this event for a later date.

Following up on the recent Royal City Rag interview with Rebecca McNeil from Environmental Defence, we are pleased to welcome her to Guelph to discuss why SLAPP Suits should be outlawed in Ontario.

SLAPP (Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation) lawsuits are intended “to censor, intimidate and silence critics by burdening them with the cost of a legal defense until they abandon their criticism or opposition.” (Wikipedia)

According to Environmental Defence, SLAPPs are a growing threat to meaningful participation in issues of public interest in Ontario and significantly affect the ability of communities to protest development in environmentally sensitive areas.

Although SLAPP suits are not uncommon in Ontario, 50 per cent of American States, and most recently Quebec have passed anti-SLAPP legislation.

Environmental Defence is working with partners Ecojustice and Canadian Environmental Law Association to finally put a stop to SLAPPs in Ontario.

As well as pushing for new legislation,  their campaign has encouraged more than 70 community groups to write to Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty requesting an end to SLAPP suits. They have also produced a petition to stop SLAPPs that you can sign HERE.

Interestingly, Environmental Defence have managed to get approximately 70 municipalities to pass a resolution asking the Province to pass anti-SLAPP legislation. Unfortunately Guelph, despite the oft claimed green credentials,  has not yet joined that group!

Joining Rebecca for a panel discussion will be some of the defendants in a $5 million lawsuit being brought by The City of Guelph City of Guelph and their development partner, Belmont Equity Partners in relation to the proposed business park development within the Hanlon Creek Watershed Complex.

SLAPPed: How SLAPP suits prevent environmental protection and preserve business as usual – POSTPONED
Monday April 12, 7-9 p.m.
Norfolk United Church, 75 Norfolk st., corner of Norfolk & Cork
Free, Wheelchair accessible

Featured Speakers:
Rebecca McNeil, Project Coordinator with Environmental Defence
Defendants of SLAPP suits from Guelph and Kitchener-Waterloo, who work to protect the Hanlon Creek and Waterloo Moraine
Hosted by Jan Hall of Royal City Rag, CFRU 93.fm
 
SLAPP is an acronym for Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation. They are heavy-handed threats of financial and legal action, usually used by developers to prevent opposition to their projects. They have been used throughout North America primarily against environmental activists and First Nations land defenders.This free public event will explain what SLAPP suits are and how they are used as a tool by developers to preserve business as usual. Also featured will be several community activists who show the human face behind SLAPP suits. Environmental Defence, along with Ecojustice and the Canadian Environmental Law Association, is working on a campaign to end SLAPP suits with a province-wide ban against their use. Anti-SLAPP measures have been adopted by the provinces of British Columbia, Quebec and more than half the United States.

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Liz Benneian (Photo: Alternativesjournal.ca)

Liz Benneian will be in Guelph on April 10 for a talk hosted by the Guelph Chapter of the Council of Canadians entitled “Organizing to Win!”. Her presentation takes place from 10 a.m. to Noon at Norfolk United Church, 75 Norfolk Street, Downtown Guelph. Admission is free.

Liz Benneian is the President of Oakvillegreen and is an effective advocate for environmental protection, sustainable planning and building resilient communities.

A poet, playwright, community advocate, history buff and outspoken environmentalist, Liz was awarded both the Individual Community Spirit Award and the Rotary’s Paul Harris Fellowship Award in 2007 for outstanding contributions to her community and the 2009 “Home Town Hero” award from Earth Day Canada.

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Interested in activism and social change? Want to share your story?

Storytelling For Social Change, a Guelph student group, have a special event, “Roots of Change” taking place on April 1 from 6 – 11 p.m. in the Ed Video Gallery, 40 Baker St, Downtown Guelph.

Four local activists from the campus and local community will share their stories of change and activism, followed by a discussion period.

Opening the event will be acoustic guitarist/singer-songwriter David Scott. During his set he will be performing “Red and White on Rope”, a song he wrote as a creative response to reading Dr. Anne-Marie Zadjlik’s journals regarding the Bracelet of Hope campaign.

The evening is free by donation to support the “Roots of Change” project. Complimentary beverages and food will be provided.

There will also be an open mic portion of the program for people to share their own stories of activism through creative expression.

The event will be recorded for broadcast on CFRU93.3fm.

RSVP to this event via Facebook here.

Come to open your mind, open your hearts, establish new connections, and see a new light or perhaps find something you think is worth fighting for… bring your ideas and positivism and together we will learn from each others stories and make a difference in our community.

Catch the organisers of Roots of Change on CFRU 93.3fm’s Royal City Rag on March 27 between 7-8 a.m.

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The Kenneth Hammond Lecture Series On Environment, Energy And Resources: Human Dimensions Of The Environment
Friday March 26 (Keynote address)
Saturday March 27 (Symposium)

Free admission
EVERYONE WELCOME!
Please RSVP to: hls@uoguelph.ca;

This annual series, sponsored by the University of Guelph and the School of Environmental Sciences (SES), is named for Kenneth Hammond, a former member of the university Board of Governors and an advocate for environmental and resource issues and environmental education.

 

Friday, March 26 at 7.00 p.m.
Keynote Address: War Memorial Hall, University of Guelph
Bringing Industry Sectors On-Board to Sustainable Development: A Case Study of the Canadian Electricity Association”
Blair Feltmate, Professor, Faculty of Environment, and Director of Sustainability Practice, University of Waterloo

Saturday, March 27 from 9 a.m. – 3.30 p.m.
All Day Symposium: City Hall Council Chambers, Downtown Guelph.

Part 1 – Presentations

  • “Community Energy Planning: The Guelph Experience”
    Karen Farbridge, Mayor, City of Guelph
  • “Energy and Environment from a community perspective”
    Mark McNally, V.P. & Founder, Green & Clean Energy Co. Ltd.
  • “Being Green: More than an Image”
    Rumina Dhalla, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Guelph
  • “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Create Value”
    Elizabeth Kurucz, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Guelph
  • “New North American Strategies to Address Climate Change”
    Jose Etcheverry Ph.D, Assistant Professor, York University

Part 2 – Comments and Perspectives Panel Discussion

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Wellington Waterwatchers will be celebrating World Water Day, Monday March 22, with a special event in the E.L. Fox Auditorium at J.F. Ross Collegiate, from 7-10 p.m.

This will be an opportunity to hear from our youth about what they think about water, something we all take far too much for granted.

High school students throughout Wellington County have been creating submissions through Wellington Waterwatchers Message in the Bottle campaign. They will be showcasing their work;  art pieces, performance pieces, and science projects. All are designed to express how valuable our water is to us, and why we need to protect and conserve this lifeline of ours.

The emcee for the event will be Derek Forgie, while spokenword artist Evalyn Parry will also perform.

The evening will also feature the Guelph premiere of  Tapped, the as yet unreleased documentary, by the producers of Who Killed The Electric Car, that takes a behind-the-scenes look into the unregulated bottled water industry.

There will also a chance to learn about  Blue W ( www.bluew.org ) a not-for-profit program dedicated to promoting municipal tap water as a healthy and waste-conscious alternative to bottled drinks.

Local band and Royal City Rag favourites Dancehall Free for All will ensure that the whole evening goes with a swing!

Tickets are just $5 and available at The Bookshelf, at 10 Carden on Mondays and Wednesdays, and at the door. Students who have created a submission get in for free. The show starts at 7:00 pm and runs till 10:00 pm, but the doors will open at 6:00 pm to showcase submissions.

Celebrate World Water Day on March 22 with Wellington Waterwatchers!

What: Celebrate World Water Day with Wellington Waterwatchers
Where: E.L. Fox Auditorium (J.F. Ross), 21 Meyer Dr. Guelph
When: March 22 from 7-10 p.m.
Tickets: $5, from The Bookshelf, at 10 Carden on Mondays and Wednesdays, and at the door. Students who have created a submission get in for free

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Coming Soon To a City You Know And Love!

Perusing plans and chatting with planners may seem like a rather dry way to spend an evening in Guelph but it is rather important.  Especially so, if you love the city you currently call home.

Few people in Guelph seem to understand how much growth the city is expected to absorb over the coming years.

By 2031, under the provincial growth plan, Places To Grow, Guelph’s population will grow from 105,000 to a staggering 165,000. All these people will need somewhere to live, never mind work.

Places to Grow mandates intensification within current limits which is why the downtown is targeted for growth however people elsewhere in the city should not think they will be spared development and intensification.

The city claims that this huge amount of growth will be sustainable. Unfortunately we will have to wait until the growth has taken place to know whether they were right or not.

Fortunately growth will be an election issue this fall. In the meantime we’ll be doing our best to delve into exactly what it all means.

Downtown Growth – March 9
6 – 8.30 p.m.
City Hall, 1 Carden St.
Meeting Room C

The City is planning for more homes, businesses and jobs downtown. Downtown Guelph has been designated as one of the Province’s Urban Growth Centres, and the City’s Downtown Secondary Plan will provide a long-term vision for future development; incorporating the goals of Ontario’s Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horsehoe, Guelph’s Community Energy Plan, and the other recent planning studies. Learn more at  www.guelph.ca/downtownplan

Guelph’s Official Plan Update – March 10 and 11
6.30 – 9.30 p.m
City Hall, 1 Carden St.
Meeting room 112 

The City’s Official Plan provides direction for all types of development within the City; environmental and cultural heritage conservation, transportation planning, and other matters. The Plan incorporates the goals of the City’s Strategic Plan, Growth Management Strategy, Community Energy Plan, Natural Heritage Strategy and other policy documents that strive to create and maintain a beautiful, well-functioning and sustainable city. Community members are invited to one of two Open House events to review and discuss key directions for the City of Guelph’s Official Plan Update. Following a presentation, attendees are invited to ask questions and share comments.
Greg Atkinson, Policy Planner
519-837-5616 Ext. 2521
E greg.atkinson@guelph.ca

For more on this and other community issues, tune into Royal City Rag, Saturdays 7-9 a.m. on CFRU 93.3fm. Speaking Truth To Power.

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Haiti Post Quake Neighbourhood (Photo courtesy: United Nations Development Programme)

Despite the size of the on-going tragedy, Haiti has had a hard time staying in the news with wall to wall Olympics coverage on TV, radio and in the newspapers.

That another earthquake, this time in Chile, was relegated to the last item of news by CBC radio early on Saturday morning, and after all the hullabaloo from Vancouver, says a lot about our priorities or lack of them. 

Its interesting that since the earthquake in Chile occurred, people in the media have been falling over themselves to try and explain the unexplainable – why only 800 people (so far) died in Chile with an 8.8 earthquake while 200,000 died in Haiti with a 7.0 quake.

There are so many differences between the two situations, it really escapes me that they would even consider trying to be so symplastic.  What we should be doing is whatever needs to done to support the people in each disaster zone, period.

Which brings me back to Haiti.

I received the following note from a 10-year veteran working in Haiti with Friends of Ile a Vache regarding the current situation there:

It is the typical Haitian struggle that has gone on for hundreds of years.
Many will survive and good flourishes but the news is not good.

The international community is rushing, working hard, doing their best.
A lot of people are NOT starving and some shelter has been given.
Great efforts of medical attention have been brought to bear.
Many valiant efforts have been instituted.
Not much more can be expected at this point – what can be done is being done.

Still the heat is building, the tent camps recently pounded by a tropical storm.
Rain filled tents, tents blew down, people evacuated to Churches etc.
That is if they had a building near them standing.
From all the dampness Malaria in areas is flourishing.
It is not normal to send money one day for the daughter’s malaria and then more the next for the parents.
The temperatures are rising – spring has sprung in Haiti.
June 1st is the beginning of hurricane season.
In 2008 Haiti got hit by 4 hurricanes.

For more on the Friends of Ile a Vache  you can visit their website at www.friendsofileavachehaiti.com.

Haiti needs to be in the news, pure and simple. There is a long way to go. However, perhaps before we get too far into the rebuilding phase, we should get to grips with Canada’s not so edifying recent involvement there.

There is an opportunity to see the documentary “Aristide and the Endless Revolution” at the Bookshelf Cinema, this Saturday March 6 at 1.00 p.m. It should be required viewing for anyone hoping to help Haiti get back on its feet again.

After the film, Kabir Joshi-Vijayan, an activist from the Toronto Haiti Action Committee will share his perspective on Haiti’s turbulent history. He will be followed by Jean Saint-Vil, a journalist and activist with AKASAN.org and Canada Haiti Action Network, who will participate via Skype (or recorded video). Kevin Skerrett, also active with Canada Haiti Action Network, will facilitate the discussion.

Haiti needs to stay in our minds and in the news

Aristide and The Endless Revolution
When: Saturday March 6 @ 1 p.m.
Where: The Bookshelf, Quebec St, Downtown Guelph
Admission: Free (donations gratefully accepted)

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The Canadian Parliament finally gets back to work on March 3 after their enforced vacation, that began on December 30, 2009, courtesy of Prime minister Stephen Harper’s prorogation.

To celebrate this auspicious occasion, the Guelph chapters of the Council of Canadians and Canadians Against Proroguing Parliament and Guelph Participates are holding “Searchlight on Democracy Walk and Talk” on March 2.

People are asked to gather at 7.00 p.m. in front of Guelph City Hall (1 Carden St) and are encouraged to bring flash lights or candles to the event.

Several speakers will address the group. Following that, the group will walk to Norfolk United church for presentations and discussions on how to hold government accountable for their actions and to consider changes in parliamentary procedure to avoid such abuses in the future.

People interested in attending the event can find more details at www.guelphparticipates.com.

Searchlight on Democracy Walk and Talk
When: Tuesday, March 2 at 7.00 p.m.
Where: City Hall – Guelph (1 Carden St.) and then to Norfolk Street United Church for presentations and a group discussion

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Guelph Enabling Garden

Guelph’s Third Annual Community Seed Exchange takes place at the Evergreen Seniors Centre on Saturday February 27  from 1.00 – 5.30 p.m.

A Pay What You Can event, the venue is fully accessible. Proceeds go to support great community gardening projects in our city!

The more people who attend (to trade, buy, and/or learn and teach about seeds) the richer our community will be.

Visit www.enablinggarden.org for more information.

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Finding Hope: Spiritual Resources In Environmental Crisis

The second in the series, February 10 at 7.30 p.m at The Fat Duck (Corner of Kortright and Edinburgh, Guelph)

Relaxed conversations on spirituality and the environment taking place in one of Guelph’s best eateries, The Fat Duck Pub!

Where can you find hope in the face of the environmental crisis that threatens the planet?

Join the discussion with people that care deeply about the fate of our planet.

Following Mike Nagy’s presentation on Wednesday, January 27 why not spend an evening with Father Jim Profit from the Ignatius Jesuit Centre on Wednesday, February 10?

All welcome.

Sponsored by the Anglican and United Churches

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Guelph-born actor and comedian Daniel Stolfi brings his one-man show about his harrowing experience battling cancer, Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, to the Guelph Youth Music Centre on February 27.  This special presentation is a fundraiser for the Wellington County Unit of the Canadian Cancer Society.

In March of 2008, Daniel Stolfi was diagnosed with Acute Non – Hodgkin’s T -Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, an aggressive form of cancer that would need equally aggressive chemotherapy treatment over the following two years of his life. While battling cancer Daniel lost his hair, his appetite, his strength and his sex drive.

In Cancer Can’t Dance Like This, Daniel takes the audience through a number of comedic monologues, musical numbers and character portrayals of his lost attributes to the disease.The question: Can cancer out dance the dancing machine? Only time will tell.

Don’t miss the opportunity to see this inspirational performance.

Where: Guelph Youth Music Centre, Cardigan Street, Guelph
When: February 27 at 8.00 p.m. (Cocktail reception, courtesy of F&M Brewery and silent auction at 6.00 p.m.)

Tickets: $40 each or 2 for $70 and can be purchased at The Canadian Cancer Society office at 214 Speedvale Ave. West or call 519-824-4261 ext 3173.

The Canadian Cancer Society’s mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer. For more information about the Canadian Cancer Society please visit www.cancer.ca

Catch Daniel Stolfi on Royal City Rag, February 20 at 7.20 a.m. Royal City Rag, Saturdays from 7-9 a.m. on CFRU 93.3 fm in Guelph. Listen live on CFRU 93.3fm, or, after the fact, via the website.

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The need for reform of parliamentary procedures is still very much in the news.

Don’t forget that Ned Franks, Professor Emeritus at Queen’s University,will be in town next week for a lecture on “The State of Parliamentary Democracy in Canada”. The lecture takes place at the University of Guelph’s War Memorial Hall on Monday February 8 at 7.30 p.m.

Dr. Franks has been frequently quoted in recent editorials on the prorogation issue.

The lecture is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians – Guelph Chapter, the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph and the Central Students Association.

Also check out this clip of Ned Franks discussing Canada’s current minority government with Steve Paikin (from TVO’s The Agenda with Steve Paikin, September 25, 2009):

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The Guelph Chapter of the Council of Canadians is organizing a second event related to restoring democracy in Canada! This follows the success of the Perogies not Prorogation rally that took place  in Guelph on Saturday, January 23.

The need for reform of parliamentary procedures will be discussed on February 8 when Dr. Ned Franks, Professor Emeritus at Queen’s University, will present a lecture on “The State of Parliamentary Democracy in Canada”.

Dr. Franks has been frequently quoted in recent editorials on the prorogation issue.

The lecture is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians – Guelph Chapter, the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph and the Central Students Association and will be held at the University of Guelph’s War Memorial Hall at 7.30 p.m. on Monday February 8.

Here is a clip of Ned Franks discussing Canada’s current minority government with Steve Paikin (from TVO’s The Agenda with Steve Paikin, September 25, 2009):

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A Guelph benefit for the people of Haiti takes place on February 7 at the River Run Centre. The event features Kevin Breit, Scott Merritt, Jane Burnett, Dionne Brand, the University of Guelph choirs and The Guelph music revue, an ensemble featuring some of Guelph’s renowned musicians and singer-songwriters.

  • Kevin Breit is one of Canada’s most in-demand guitarists (Norah Jones, Rosanne Cash, k. d. Lang, Bill Frisell). He will be performing with Guelph’s Ted Warren, one of Canada’s most accomplished drummers.
  • Scott Merritt is an MCA recording artist and an award-winning singer-songwriter and producer with an always growing and fiercely dedicated following.
  • Jane Bunnett is an internationally acclaimed Canadian jazz icon with Juno awards, Grammy nominations, and an appointment to the Order of Canada.
  • Dionne Brand is a renowned poet, novelist, essayist, and film-maker born in Trinidad and living in Toronto.
  • The University of Guelph Choirs, directed by Dr. Marta McCarthy are a powerful amalgamation of both the University Chamber Choir and the University Women’s Choir.
  • The Guelph Music Revue is a stellar gathering of Guelph’s award-winning musicians, band leaders, and singer-songwriters featuring Andrew Craig, Nick Craine, Craig Norris, Shane Philips, Tannis Slimmon, Sue Smith, Sam Turton, Jeff Bird, Adam Bowman, Vish Khanna, Jane Lewis, Brenda McMorrow, Ambre McLean, Harri Palm, Stu Peterson, Jesse Turton, Brenda Lewis, Jude Vadala, The Season Singers – and more to come!

Help Haiti: A Guelph Benefit for Earthquake Relief

Sunday, February 7 at 7.00 p.m.
The River Run Centre
35 Woolwich St., Guelph, ON
Tickets $30 (reserved) available from the River Run Box Office: 519-763-3000 or online

All proceeds to Canadian Red Cross – All services are being donated including the River Run Centre facilities.

Additional donations will be accepted at the event

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